Breathing Retraining: From Sick/Victims to Superhumans

About electronic-book
"Normal breathing: the key to vital health"
(My big e-book for Buteyko practitioners
and very serious Buteyko students; 298 pages) 70 Euro


Content of the book (with page numbers) 

Introduction 9
Chapter 1. Scientific studies about breathing-health connection 10
1.1 Minute ventilation in health and disease 10
1.2 Do people notice their overbreathing (hyperventilation)? 11
1.3 The main effect of hyperventilation 11
1.4 Do we need this “poisonous” CO2? 11
1.5 CO2 deficiency: the main physiological effect of hyperventilation 12
1.6 Medical studies of hyperventilation 15
1.7 Studies about the hyperventilation provocation test 16
1.8 Hypoventilation as a health problem 17
1.9 End-tidal CO2 and different health problems 17
1.10 Hypoxia and blood shunting 18
1.11 Critical care patients and arterial CO2 19
1.12 Breath-holding time and its clinical significance 20
1.13 Role of nitric oxide 23
1.14 Changes in the ANS (autonomous nervous system) 24
1.15 Focus on diseases 25
1.16 Why breathing? 31
1.17 Evolution of air on Earth 32
Conclusions 33
Q&A section for Chapter 1 33
References for chapter 1 38

Chapter 2. The chemical and physiological mechanisms of immediate regulation of breathing 45
Introduction 45
2.1 Biochemical control of respiration 45
2.4 Control of breathing during breath holding 48
2.5 Control of breathing in people with chronic hyperventilation 49
2.6 Breath holding control in diseased states 50
2.7 Connection between BHT (breath holding time after normal expiration) and arterial CO2 51
Conclusions 52
Q&A section for Chapter 2 52
References for chapter 2 53

Chapter 3. Lifestyle factors that matter 55
3.1 Stress, anxiety and strong emotions 55
3.2 Physical inactivity 56
3.3 Overeating 57
3.4 Deep breathing exercises 58
3.5 Overheating 59
3.6 Talking with deep inhalations, a loud voice, or a high pitch 60
3.7 Mouth breathing 60
3.8 Morning hyperventilation 62
3.9 Embryonic and fetal development in a woman hyperventilating during her pregnancy 64
3.10 Special factors for infants 65
3.11 Nutritional deficiencies 65
3.12 Exposure to toxic chemicals 65
Conclusions 66
Q&A section for Chapter 3 67
References for chapter 3 67

Chapter 4. Western methods of breathing retraining 71
Introduction 71
4.1 University of California Medical School, San Francisco, USA 71
4.2 Papworth Hospital, Cambridge, UK 71
4.3 Portland Veterans Administration Medical Centre, USA 72
4.4 St. Bartholomew's Hospital, London, UK 72
4.5 Institute of Stress Research, Netherlands 73
4.6 Department of Psychiatry, University of Oxford, Warneford Hospital, UK 73
4.7 Department of Psychiatry, University of Utrecht, Netherlands 74
4.8 Cornell University Medical College, New York, USA 74
4.9 California School of Professional Psychology, San Diego, USA 74
4.10 Lothian Area Respiratory Function Service, City Hospital, Edinburgh, UK 75
4.11 Service de Psychosomatique, Hospital du Sacre-Caeur de Montreal, Quebec, Canada 76
4.12 Laboratory of Pneumology, U. Z. Gasthuisberg, Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, Belgium 76
4.13 New Zealand Guidelines Group 77
4.14 Stanford University, Palo Alto, USA 77
4.15 Common features of Western methods of breathing retraining 78
Q&A section for Chapter 4 81
References for chapter 4 81

Chapter 5. History and advance of the Buteyko breathing method 84
Introduction 84
5.1 Some historical facts about the origins of the method 84
5.2 Breathing and modern diseases 85
5.3 Development of specific health problems 87
5.4 Practical discoveries and their application 91
5.5 Advance of the method in the USSR and Russia 93
5.6 Advance of the method in western countries 94
Q&A section for Chapter 5 97
References for chapter 5 100

Chapter 6. The control pause 103
Introduction 103
6.1 The HVPT (hyperventilation provocation test) 103
6.2 The CP test 103
6.3 Lifestyle factors that influence the personal CP 105
6.4 How CP measurements relate to aCO2 values 107
6.5 Conditions for correct CP measurements 107
6.7 The CP and general health 111
6.8 CP and various systems and parameters of the organism 112
6.9 The link between the CP and symptoms 116
6.10 Maximum, average and minimum daily CPs 117
6.11 Other pauses and their definitions 118
6.12 Potential dangers of long breath holds and strong air hunger 118
6.13 Short pauses as safer alternatives 119
Q&A section for Chapter 6 120
References for chapter 6 121

Chapter 7. Level 1: First steps for better health 124
Introduction 124
7.1 Nasal breathing only 124
7.2 Mouth taping 124
7.3 Prevention of sleeping on the back 125
7.4 The Emergency Procedure during acute or life threatening situations 125
7.5 Other possible applications of the Emergency Procedure 127
7.6 Constant basic control of breathing 129
Q&A section for Chapter 7 130
References for chapter 7 131

Chapter 8. Level 2: Breathing exercises, sleep, focal infections, and cleansing reactions 132
Introduction 132
8.1 General goals of the breathing exercises 132
8.2 Preliminary requirements for learning breathing exercises 132
8.4 More about relaxation and posture 140
8.5 Gradualism – an approach to learning air hunger 142
8.6 Which breathing exercises to choose from? 142
8.7 What are the criteria of success? 144
8.8 How much to exercise? 145
8.9 Day-after-day progress in breathing retraining 145
8.10 Evening and morning CPs 145
8.11 General observations about sleep 146
8.12 Why breathing gets deeper during sleep 147
8.13 Modern Western sleep 147
8.14 Methods to prevent night hyperventilation 150
8.15 Supplements 152
8.16 Steroids 154
8.17 Order or priorities of actions 155
8.18 Focal infections 155
8.19 Practical actions in relation to focal infections 159
8.20 Breathing and focal infections: practical cases 160
8.21 Cleansing reactions: their causes, basic mechanisms, and symptoms 162
8.22 Practical steps during the cleansing reaction 163
Q&A section for Chapter 8 164
References for chapter 8 168

Chapter 9. Level 2: Personal changes, physical exercise and other useful tools 171
9.1 Personal changes due to the first breathing sessions 171
9.2 Exercise 171
9.3 Some practical suggestions regarding your personal hygiene and oral health 175
9.4 Diet and nutrition 178
9.5 Heat/cold adaptation 184
9.6 Development of correct speaking skills 187
9.7 Prevention of hyperventilation conditioned to favorite activities 188
9.8 A typical long session of the Buteyko breathing with light intensity 188
9.9 What to expect and goal setting 189
9.10 Imagery and visualization 189
9.11 Measurements of pulse and its significance 190
9.12 Possible intensities and durations of the breathing sessions 191
Q&A section for Chapter 9 193
References for chapter 9 200

Chapter 10. Level 3: CP 60 or excellent health 205
Introduction 205
10.1 Constant breathing control 205
10.2 Why it is difficult to break through 40 s threshold 206
10.3 Physical activity and breathing exercises 207
10.4 Strengthening the weakest parts of the organism 207
10.5 Posture 208
10.6 Sleep 209
10.7 Avoidance of allergies 209
10.8 Other special activities 210
10.9 Other dietary suggestions 211
10.10 Negative emotions and their relation to muscular tension and physical activity 212
10.11 The check list of questions for getting CP 60 215
Q&A section for Chapter 10 216
References for chapter 10 217

Chapter 11. Breathing and some GI problems 218
Introduction 218
11.1 Normal digestion and abnormalities 218
11.2 Chronic hyperventilation and its effects on the GI system 219
11.3 Interaction of these destructive CHV factors with the organism 221
11.4 Factors that define the time of digestion 221
11.5 Breathing control during and after meals 224
11.6 Chewing and particle size of the swallowed food 225
11.7 Effects of various foods on breathing 225
11.8 Focal infections and their GI effects 227
11.9 Positive effects of high CPs on the GI tract 228
11.10 Triggers of GI problems and the soft diet 228
11.11 Mechanical shaking of the body 231
11.12 Use of spices 231
11.13 Other observations and suggestions 238
Q&A section for Chapter 11 240
References for chapter 11 240

Chapter 12. Special topics related to the Buteyko method 244
12.1 Review of some effects that take place at 10 and 20 s CP. 244
12.2 Emphysema and breathing retraining 244
12.3 sleep apnea and breathing retraining 245
12.3 Hypercapnic vasoconstriction 245
12.4 Practical suggestions for the youngest Buteyko students (0-1 years old) 247
12.5 Teaching young children (from 2 up to 14-16 years old) 248
Q&A section for Chapter 12 250
References for chapter 12 250

Chapter 13. Various other breathing-related topics 252
Introduction 252
13.1 Hatha yoga teaching and breathing 252
13.2 Hibernation 255
13.3 Breath holding abilities in animals 257
13.4 Breathing in relation to metabolic and health states 258
13.5 Breathing analogy in health and disease 258
13.6 Homeostasis and various simple parameters that reflect it 260
13.7 Socio-psychological aspects of breathing 262
References for chapter 13 265

Chapter 14. Future of the Buteyko movement and challenges of Buteyko breathing teachers 267
14.1 Current trends 267
14.2 The hidden challenge of the modern world: the Buteyko team vs. abnormal lifestyle factors 267
14.3 Teaching the method: what is the core? 270
14.4 The method and its impact on environmental and lifestyle factors 272
14.5 Ten typical mistakes made by breathing practitioners 272
14.6 Teaching and promoting the Buteyko method in new places 274
References for chapter 14 279

Appendix 1. Summary and explanation of normal respiratory and some related values 280
Appendix 2. Approximate relationship between breath holding time and alveolar CO2 concentration 284
Appendix 3. Symptoms of hyperventilation syndrome treated in Novosibirsk by Doctor Buteyko and his colleagues 285
Appendix 4. Clinical effects of the Buteyko breathing method on common health problems (based on work of Russian Buteyko doctors and own experience) 286
Respiratory problems 286
Cardiovascular problems 287
Hormonal diseases 288
Gastrointestinal problems 289
Diseases of kidneys and urinary tract 290
Diseases of the musculoskeletal system 290
Skin diseases 291
Allergies and states of immunodeficiency 292
Appendix 5. Macro-minerals and their signs of deficiency 293
• Potassium 293
• Sodium 294
• Calcium 294
• Magnesium 295
Appendix 6. Typical changes due to the Buteyko breathing exercises and subsequent normalization of breathing 296

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